Kathryn Bigelow Detroit

Kathryn Bigelow’s fierce, fervent Detroit is a loud cry for change

Kathryn Bigelow’s Detroit pushes its atmosphere like an invading force. Through sheer will and punishing fury, it leaves a charred, empty sense of helplessness, and there’s nothing that can be done to salve the burn. Indeed, audiences who watch Bigelow’s dramatization of the Algiers Motel tragedy will feel the wrath of her filmmaking. An uncomfortable,…

By Cory Woodroof
War Machine

David Michôd’s War Machine works well as cautionary tale, not as satire

War is Hell, but War Machine is frustrating. David Michôd’s somewhat-satire of the Obama era’s continued efforts in the Afghanistan insurgency is far from a spirited successor to Dr. Stangelove; it’s more a nuanced look at the sobering complexities of the war through the eyes of fictional general Glen McMahon, based in part on Gen.…

By Cory Woodroof
The Promise

Why the Armenian-Genocide Film ‘The Promise’ Is Crucial Cinema

It’s easy to be skeptical about preachy “man must” movies. You know: “Man must” not make war. “Man must” not ruin the Earth. “Man must” not be cruel to other people. The Promise (2016) is not a “man must” movie. Rather, it’s “must-see.” The film, which follows a love triangle as it progresses during the…

By Simon Hardy Butler
The Lost City of Z

Review: James Gray’s ‘The Lost City of Z’

James Gray’s The Lost City of Z has moments that hearken back to any old Hollywood adventure epic – the grand journeys of yesteryear in which destination and discovery were the sole rewards. The music swells, the actors look stalwart, sly and in charge, and the scope widens to reveal a scenic vista worth many…

By Cory Woodroof
Scorsese's Silence

Faith no more: Why Scorsese’s Silence is a haunting work of art

‘My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?’ The desolate words of Jesus Christ on the cross offer one way into Martin Scorsese’s new film, Silence. The film inhabits the character of a 17th Century Jesuit missionary to Japan who is forced to recant his faith. The ‘silence’ being referred to in the film’s…

By Ed Rowe
D. W. Griffith - Intolerance

100 Years of D. W. Griffith’s Intolerance: Love’s Struggle Throughout the Ages

We have another decade to go before the United States turns 250 – and sixty years total before the tercentennial in 2076 – but now, before 2016 comes to an end, we can at last – and certainly not least! – celebrate the 100th Anniversary of one of the earliest epics (and earliest motion pictures…

By Jeffrey DeCristofaro
Glory - American Civil War

The Blue and The Grey: The American Civil War on film

So many films have been made about this long and tragic civil war that I would not attempt to examine them all in one post. However, it is interesting to see how film-makers have dealt with the subject over the more than one hundred year history of cinema. As long ago as 1915, D.W. Griffith…

By Pete Johnson