Miss Kiet's Children

Interview: How Petra and Peter discovered Miss Kiet’s Children

Last month I published a review of Miss Kiet’s Children, directed by Dutch documentary filmmakers Petra Lataster-Czisch and Peter Lataster. I don’t think I could have been more emphatic in my praise for what they have achieved with the film. Shot over the course of a full school year, the Lataster’s provide an immersive look…

By James Curnow
Cars 3

Cars 3 floors past predecessor, gets series back on road

With the weight of its predecessor weighing down on it like 500 Hummers, the newest installment in Pixar’s Cars universe floors it back to where it all began, and finds its footing (err, wheeling?). The first Cars films was an amiable, loving ode to small town values (the “Our Town” sequence a damning fist to…

By Cory Woodroof

Wonder Woman an epic step forward in blockbuster filmmaking

In the immortal words of Dolly Levi, “it takes a woman!” It’s precisely the lesson Hollywood needed to learn as it scratched its head, wondering how to keep the highly-lucrative superhero genre afloat in a sea of familiarity and waning patience from audiences and critics alike. They wanted something fresh. They got it. Tinseltown has…

By Cory Woodroof
God Knows Where I Am

Interview: Jedd and Todd Wider on ‘God Knows Where I Am’

Several years ago Rachel Aviv published an article in the New Yorker about Linda Bishop, a woman who had struggled with mental health issues for much of her life. In October 2007, having been recently released from psychiatric care, Linda began to suffer from paranoid delusions about being pursued. She broke into an empty New…

By James Curnow
Sanjuro

Message Movies: Liking Films Despite Their Perspectives

You’ve got to admit that CURNBLOG’s readers have a deep memory. Witness a comment posted by “Carlos” in response to my recent article on the movie The Promise (2016) and a statement I made in it that said this: I don’t usually urge cinephiles to run after movies with messages for altruistic purposes, as I,…

By Simon Hardy Butler
Hendrix at the Monterey Pop Festival

D.A. Pennebaker’s Monterey Pop: 50 Years on from the Monterey International Pop Festival

Held fifty years ago this month on the virtual solstice of the Summer of Love, the Monterey International Pop Festival was a dazzling counterculture coming-out party. Its infectious good vibes and series of revelatory performances that soon passed into rock ’n’ roll legend were captured by documentarian D. A. Pennebaker, fresh off the release of…

By Rick Ouellette
War Machine

David Michôd’s War Machine works well as cautionary tale, not as satire

War is Hell, but War Machine is frustrating. David Michôd’s somewhat-satire of the Obama era’s continued efforts in the Afghanistan insurgency is far from a spirited successor to Dr. Stangelove; it’s more a nuanced look at the sobering complexities of the war through the eyes of fictional general Glen McMahon, based in part on Gen.…

By Cory Woodroof