Miss Kiet's Children

Review: Live your childhood again with ‘Miss Kiet’s Children’

With their new film Miss Kiet’s Children, filmmaking couple Petra Lataster-Czisch and Peter Lataster have achieved something truly extraordinary. Over the course of two mesmerising hours, they’ve found a way to have viewers abandon their mundane adult perspectives, transporting them back to a time in which stolen crayons and memorising times-tables were great emotional challenges.…

By James Curnow
2001 A Space Odyssey A Clockwork Orange

Puppet The Critic Show – 2001: A Clockwork Odyssey

What if I told you that A Clockwork Orange was THE SEQUEL to 2001: A Space Odyssey? After first hearing this, you might think it was absurd. But upon further investigation, you may find that there’s more to it than you might think. Consider the scene in 2001 in which Moon-Watcher throws the bone into…

By Puppet
The Promise

Why the Armenian-Genocide Film ‘The Promise’ Is Crucial Cinema

It’s easy to be skeptical about preachy “man must” movies. You know: “Man must” not make war. “Man must” not ruin the Earth. “Man must” not be cruel to other people. The Promise (2016) is not a “man must” movie. Rather, it’s “must-see.” The film, which follows a love triangle as it progresses during the…

By Simon Hardy Butler
The Lost City of Z

Review: James Gray’s ‘The Lost City of Z’

James Gray’s The Lost City of Z has moments that hearken back to any old Hollywood adventure epic – the grand journeys of yesteryear in which destination and discovery were the sole rewards. The music swells, the actors look stalwart, sly and in charge, and the scope widens to reveal a scenic vista worth many…

By Cory Woodroof
Cristian Mungiu Graduation

Review: Cristian Mungiu’s ‘Graduation’

In the opening shot of Cristian Mungiu’s groundbreaking 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days (2007), we see fish swimming in a bowl. Behind the bowl, a poster of New York stands as a paradise forever out of reach. That suggestion of a free world beyond the reach of everyday Romanians becomes far more overt…

By Jonathan Eig

Puppet the Critic Show: Ghost In The Shell

I’m not going to lie to you; I was never a huge fan of either the original manga or anime of Ghost In The Shell when I was younger. Actually, I didn’t even want to give them a chance, being that I cared less about comics as vehicles for ideas than about the ways in…

By Puppet
Goodfellas

The Color of Blood: Why Gore’s Hue Might Affect Cinematic Believability

Does the color of blood in a violent scene affect a movie’s credibility? I’ve been asking this question for a while after mulling a variety of great films that feature unrealistic-looking hemo-splatter yet remain some of the most believable pictures of all time. The Godfather (1972) has a scene in which the crime-family head Vito…

By Simon Hardy Butler