King of Hearts Philippe De Brocca

Mental Illness and ‘King of Hearts’: A Rumination

It finally may be time for me to put away childish things. The estimable editor of CURNBLOG, James Curnow, recently offered up on Twitter an intriguing hashtag, #7childhoodfilms, that generated a large number of responses from folks all over the Internet—including me. The aim was to cite films one liked in childhood and still revere…

By Simon Hardy Butler
Forbidden Planet

The 60th Anniversary of Forbidden Planet: From Shakespeare to Star Trek

With Star Trek now celebrating its fiftieth Anniversary, and with yet another Star Trek feature released earlier this summer that pays further tribute to Gene Roddenberry’s vision and legacy (as well as the cherished memory of the original Mr. Spock, the late, great Leonard Nimoy, and the young and tragically ill-fated new Chekov, Anton Yelchin),…

By Jeffrey DeCristofaro
BFG Pete's Dragon

Who Wore It Better: A Cinematic Smackdown

News flash: Hollywood is derivative. I’ll pause here to let that sink in. I know it must come as quite a shock. So I suppose if I’m a producer and I’m plunking down 50 mill on two hours of fantasy, I’d want as much assurance as possible that an audience would actually come see the…

By Jonathan Eig
Swamp Thing

5 Classic Monster Movies That Are So Bad They’re Good

Monster movies haven’t always had a good run. For much of Hollywood’s history, we’ve been presented with bad stories, poor funding and somewhat terrible special effects. Rarely do films in this genre get the same kind of love you find in superhero films or war movies. But sometimes they get something right. Every now and…

By Isa
Florence Foster Jenkins

Reviewing Florence Foster Jenkins: The Challenge of Dream-Chasing

There’s a pivotal moment at the end of Florence Foster Jenkins, the latest from director Stephen Frears, in which a gravely ill Jenkins (Meryl Streep) gently confronts her husband St. Clair Bayfield (Hugh Grant) about a negative review of one of her concerts. The review isn’t necessarily incorrect – it states, rather bluntly, that Foster is…

By Cory Woodroof
Monsieur Mayonnaise

Trevor Graham’s Monsieur Mayonnaise: Getting Mora out of History

It will come as no surprise to regular readers that over the last year I’ve become increasingly interested in the films of Australian director Philippe Mora, most particularly his films focused on the representation of history. From Swastika (1974) to Snide and Prejudice (1997), each of Mora’s historically centered works is part of a life-long…

By James Curnow
Pete's Dragon

Folksy ‘Pete’s Dragon’ charms with homespun feel

The original Pete’s Dragon was a 70s family musical produced by a different Disney in a different era, complete with singing villagers, a lighthouse, Helen Reddy and a cartoon gentle giant dragon spliced into the landscape of a live action film (taking a page from the Mary Poppins playbook). The film has a fan base…

By Cory Woodroof